3 Steps to Build Your Resume for College Applications

Writing a college application resume allows you to put together your high school achievements and major life accomplishments. Resume writing makes me squeamish even at my age (what is an objective anyway), so I am sure it can be intimidating for your teen!

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Building a resume helps you see your awesomeness on one page AND you can send it to your school counselor so they can write your letter of recommendation. With a massive number of students to see, anything you can do to help your school counselor is appreciated!

What’s Special About Your College Resume?

 

Senior year is a confirmation of the saying that everything with a beginning has an end. As you approach the end of high school, you’ll take on the nerve-racking and tedious process of college applications. With your college resume, applying for college admission becomes easier.

How?

Applications can be overwhelming. So, when put all your information and high school accomplishments in a list, you will have an easier time accessing what you need. Your high school resume is a concise yet detailed description of your educational background and achievements, hobbies, and work experiences.

Plus, you can copy and paste, rather than rewrite everything fresh (or when I did it, on a typewriter).

Your recommenders will also find your resume helpful as it reminds them of everything that makes you, you- as far as your education is concerned.

3 Ways to Build Your College Resume

·         Research Your Accomplishments

Research in this case, means taking note of everything that makes you awesome. Your brand. What sets you apart?  Ask your parents and teachers to help you remember previous achievements.

Remember this – your grades are just a number. And you aren’t the only one with that number. Leadership roles, awards, hobbies, past jobs, and other activities define who you are as a human. And IMHO, humans change the world- not GPA’s.

Colleges need more than your scores to know that you’re dedicated to learning and improving the lives of others around you. Fill your resume with actual life facts that prove you will be a great part of their community.      

 

·         Arrange them in Order of Priority

Now that you know what your resume should include, remove the less important things. Mention your highest awards, key leadership roles, and remarkable experiences that distinguish you from the next college applicant.

Don’t flinch from including any special skills that make you unique and can boost the originality of your college resume. Have you worked part-time while in school? Briefly mention this and your duties/responsibilities.

If you want a winning resume, don’t stop reviewing the details and reorganizing them until you’re 100% convinced that it’s flawless.   

·         Write, Edit, and Proofread for Easy Scanning

Writing and editing is the next step in building your resume. Make sure you include your full name, address, email address (professional one please), and phone number. Of course, your high school should also be included here.

The typical resume structure comprises three main headings: Activities and Work, Honors and Awards, and Other Skills and Experiences. Under these headings, provide specific details including names of places, positions, dates, purpose and results, and interests.

List the most important and most recent achievements first, and ensure that every detail comes out clear and simple. Edit and proofread to remove errors and correct omissions.

 

Are You Ready?

Resumes aren’t just for college graduates or people seeking employment. When you build your college resume, you simplify the process for college and scholarship applications.

Are you ready to get started? Make sure you get your resume prep sheet!

 

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